Rolling Stone calls overrule court jury in U-Va. defamation case

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Rolling Stone calls overrule court jury in U-Va. defamation case

Lawyers Rolling Stone has asked a federal court to the decision of the jury that the magazine defamed a University of Virginia administrator overrule in a retracted account of a gang brotherhood gap.

The motion filed in federal court Monday came a month after a 10-member jury found Rolling Stone and journalist Sabrina Rubin Erdely responsible for defaming the former U-Va. Dean Nicole Eramo in an article published on the campus sexual assault online in November 2014. The jury Eramo awarded $ 3,000,000 in November.

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Rolling Stone calls overrule court jury in U-Va. defamation case

By Rees T. Shapiro

grade Point

December 6 at 00:33


Rolling Stone editor Sabrina Rubin Erdely, left, and Rolling Stone magazine Deputy Managing Editor Sean Woods, right, walk with their legal team at the federal court in Charlottesville, Va., Tuesday, November 1, 2016. (AP Photo / Steve Helber)

Lawyers Rolling Stone has asked a federal court to the decision of the jury that the magazine defamed a University of Virginia administrator overrule in a retracted account of a gang brotherhood gap.

The motion filed in federal court Monday came a month after a 10-member jury found Rolling Stone and journalist Sabrina Rubin Erdely responsible for defaming the former U-Va. Dean Nicole Eramo in an article published on the campus sexual assault online in November 2014. The jury Eramo awarded $ 3,000,000 in November.

[Jury finds reporter, Rolling Stone responsible for defaming U-Va. Dean of gang rape story]

Keep reading

The article – “A Rape on Campus” – focusing on the experience of a U-Va. student named Jackie and became one of the most read stories of the magazine, attracting millions of readers. It emphasized what Rolling Stone described as a nationwide epidemic of sexual violence, in particular to know that women at U-Va. faced indifference when reporting their attacks to university administrators. But the magazine retracted the article after a Washington Post investigation into question important aspects of the account of a gang rape at a fraternity house near the campus … In the filing on behalf of Rolling Stone and Erdely, argue the lawyers the judge, Glen E. Conrad, must govern the decision of the jury, in particular the judges’ finding that the magazine article published a second time in December 2014, when a note was added editor to the online version of the story, but the story itself remained unchanged. The jury concluded that the magazine is to address a different audience of readers than those who had read the bill for the first time by attaching the note at the top of the article.

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